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Year : 2017  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 79-88

Nigerian health care: A quick appraisal


1 Department of Traumatic and Orthopaedic Surgery, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria
3 Department of Opthalmology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria
4 Department of Paediatrics, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria
5 Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria
6 Department of Community Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria
7 Health Services Management Board, Katsina State, Nigeria
8 National Orthopaedic Hospital, Dala, Kano, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Yau Zakari Lawal
Department of Traumatic and Orthopaedic Surgery, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria
Nigeria
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DOI: 10.4103/smj.smj_38_16

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Qualitative health care is a fundamental right of all citizens of a given country. How this health care is delivered depends significantly on the economy, dedication, and quality of the health-care providers and the political will of the government of the country. Health care may be public run or organized by private health-care providers. We can also have an intercalated program where there is public–private partnership. Whichever way this basic fundamental human right is delivered, sustainability, affordability, and accessibility are vital to its success. The Nigerian health-care delivery can be broadly classified into two; the hitherto existing traditional medicine and the modern orthodox medicine which came to our shores with the arrival of the European colonialists. The traditional system is still patronized by most Nigerians and is known by different linguistic terminologies such as the “Wanzami” or Barber in Hausa and the “Babalawo” in Yoruba language. Traditional birth attendants also exist in all communities in Nigeria complemented by herbalist and spiritualists of different shades and callings. It is our aim to give a brief account of our observations on the Nigerian health-care system with a view to correcting the challenges by the government and the public in general.


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