Sahel Medical Journal

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1--7

Effect of oral midazolam in preventing postoperative emergence agitation in children


Atiku Mamuda1, Mustapha Ibrahim Gudaji2 
1 Department of Anaesthesia, Bayero University Kano, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria
2 Department of Psychiatry, Bayero University Kano, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Atiku Mamuda
Department of Anaesthesia, Bayero University Kano, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, PMB 3452, Kano
Nigeria

Introduction: Emergence from general anaesthesia can be complicated by the presence of agitation in children and thus presents a challenging situation for postanesthesia care providers. Several factors are associated with emergence agitation (EA). These include pain, preoperative anxiety, young age, poor adaptability, short time to recovery, among others. Objective: This study aimed to determine the effect of oral midazolam in preventing postoperative EA in children. Materials and Methods: This was a case–control study carried out among 80 healthy children aged 1–10 years scheduled for day-case surgery. The children were randomly assigned to receive either a syrup of paracetamol 10 mg/kg with injectable midazolam 0.5 mg/kg added to the syrup (Group A) or a placebo in the form of paracetamol syrup (Group B) at a dose of 10 mg/kg 30 min before induction of anesthesia. Patients' state of agitation was assessed every 5 min for the 1st h by means of an EA scale. Children with an agitation score of 3 or 4 were classified as agitated. Prolonged agitation was defined as a score of ≥3 lasting 15 min after arrival in the recovery room. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Software for Social Sciences version 20. Results: Eighty children aged 1–10 years were enrolled in the study. Majority of the procedures were circumcisions (48.75%), while urethral dilatation, examination under anesthesia, and tongue release were the least (1.25%). There was no statistically significant difference in the agitation state of the two groups (P = 0.60). Conclusion: Premedication with oral midazolam 0.5 mg/kg administered 30 min preoperatively does not prevent EA in all cases.


How to cite this article:
Mamuda A, Gudaji MI. Effect of oral midazolam in preventing postoperative emergence agitation in children.Sahel Med J 2019;22:1-7


How to cite this URL:
Mamuda A, Gudaji MI. Effect of oral midazolam in preventing postoperative emergence agitation in children. Sahel Med J [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Aug 5 ];22:1-7
Available from: http://www.smjonline.org/article.asp?issn=1118-8561;year=2019;volume=22;issue=1;spage=1;epage=7;aulast=Mamuda;type=0