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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2000  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 87-92

Social correlatives of drug use among secondary school students in Port-harcourt, southern Nigeria


Department of Paediatrics, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Rivers State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
I C Anochie
Department of Paediatrics, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Rivers State
Nigeria
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The social correlates of drug use were examined in 987 final year (SS3) secondary school students dt .Port Harcourt, Southern Nigeria using a self-report drug use questionnaire. Ever use of alcohol and cigarette was found to be positively correlated with male sex. Religion of the respondents did not influence the rate of use of these drugs. However, cigarette and amphetamine use was significantly more in christian students who did not attend religious services frequently (p < O.05). Students with non-standard families were more significant(y involved in alcohol, cigarette, inhalants and amphetamine use. The use of the drugs was found not to correlate with parents' occupation, except cannabis use, which correlated positively with children of mothers in high professional jobs. findings indicate the need for parents and guardians to take the religious upbringing of their children more seriously and encourage them to join religious clubs such as girls ' guide, hoy' brigade, etc. Parents should maintain a standard family, and act as good role models to their children by living drug free life.


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