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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2005  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 16-19

The risk of transfusion-transmissible viral infections in the niger-delta area of Nigeria


Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, P.M.B. 6173, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

Date of Web Publication23-Dec-2014

Correspondence Address:
O A Ejele
Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, P.M.B. 6173, Port Harcourt
Nigeria
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  Abstract 

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Million's of lives are saved each year through blood transfusion. Nevertheless people ha ve increased risk of becoming infected with transfusion - transmissible viral infections through transfusion of blood and blood products that have not been tested correctly. This study was undertaken to determine the risk of transfusion- transmissible viral infections through transfusion of unscreened blood and blood products.
METHODOLOGY: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibodies to Hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) screening was performed on 1500 consecutive blood donors in the University of Port­ Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Rivers State, Nigeria.
RESULTS: Of the one thousand five hundred blood donors screened, 15 (1%), 17 (1.1%) and 7 (0.5%) of donors had
H1V, HBsAg and anti-HCV respectively. 12 (0.8%) had HIV-1 infection, 2 (0.1%) had HIV-2 while 1(0.07%) had dual
HIV I and 2 infection. Two (0.1%) had co-infection of HIV and HBV. The highest HBsAg and anti-HCV burden

/ 1026

/ 1026
accounted for the highest infection burden for HIV 7 362 ( 1.9%). Males accounted for the highest infection burden for
17
/ 1481
( 1.1%) and anti-HCV 7
(0.1%) while female donors had the highest HIV prevalence 1
(5.3%).
mercial remunerated donors showed the highest HIV, HBsAg and anti-HCV infection rates (1.4%), (1 .7%) and
(0.8%) respectively.
CONCLUSION: This study confirms a high prevalence of transfusion-transmissible viral infections among blood donors and describes the groups that are at risk. This calls for the immediate implementation of a mandatory universal donor screening policy for screening all blood donor units intended for transfusion, the setting up of a national blood transfusion service, run on the basis of voluntary non remunerated, low risk blood donors, and health education of the entire Niger Delta Area aimed at behavioural change from high risk behaviour that makes people vulnerable.

Keywords: Blood donors, Transfusion, Viral infection, Niger-Delta, Nigeria


How to cite this article:
Ejele O A, Erhabor O, Nwauche C A. The risk of transfusion-transmissible viral infections in the niger-delta area of Nigeria. Sahel Med J 2005;8:16-9

How to cite this URL:
Ejele O A, Erhabor O, Nwauche C A. The risk of transfusion-transmissible viral infections in the niger-delta area of Nigeria. Sahel Med J [serial online] 2005 [cited 2021 Jun 19];8:16-9. Available from: https://www.smjonline.org/text.asp?2005/8/1/16/147625

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