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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 60-63

Scorpion envenomation and its management in adults


1 Department of Medicine, Narayana Medical College Hospital, Chinthareddy Palem, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India
2 Department of Pediatrics, Narayana Medical College Hospital, Chinthareddy Palem, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India
3 Department of Forensic Medicine, Narayana Medical College Hospital, Chinthareddy Palem, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India
4 Department of Pharmacology, Narayana Medical College Hospital, Chinthareddy Palem, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India
5 Department of Neurosurgery, Narayana Medical College Hospital, Chinthareddy Palem, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Meriga Rajesh Kumar
Department of Medicine, Narayna Medical College Hospital, Chinthareddypalem, Nellore - 524 003, Andhra Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1118-8561.115262

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Background: We describe the epidemiology, clinical features, management, and outcome of adult patients of scorpion envenomation. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study involving a total of 40 patients conducted at Narayana Medical College and Hospital. All the patients had complete blood count, blood glucose, urea, creatinine, liver function test, urine examination, electrocardiography, X-ray chest, and two-dimensional echocardiography as and when indicated. Results: During the study period, a total 40 adult patients were managed for scorpion sting. Mean age was 34.93 ± 12.6 years. Farmers 34 (85%) cases were more commonly bitten by scorpion. Lower limbs (65%) were common site of sting than upper limbs. Stings were more frequent during daytime 27 67.5% vs. 32.5%). Only 12 patients (30%) received first aid before coming to our hospital. Many patients 28 (70%) reached the hospital within 6 h of scorpion sting. Most of the patients 32 (80%) were conscious. There was evidence of pulmonary edema in 15 (37.5%) patients. Eight (20%) patients required elective ventilation and one of the patients had fatal outcome giving an overall mortality of 2.5%. Mean hospital stay was 3.15 ± 1.67 days). Conclusion: Scorpion stings are more frequent in male farmers with most stings occurring in the lower limbs during the daytime in the study population. Local pain was the most common manifestation. Scorpion stings could nonetheless be associated with severe complications with fatal outcome. We recommend public awareness about preventive measures and early management of scorpion sting as measures of reducing scorpion sting related morbidity and mortality.


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